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Growth Driven Marketing Blog

You planned your trade show event, you executed a great event that produced qualified leads, and now you need to follow-up generate a return on your investment.

But, you’re thinking about what happened after the previous trade show. Your marketing team sent the leads to the sales department, no one followed up, too much time passed, and the money you invested in the trade show went out the window.

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After getting your budget approved and forming a plan for your next trade show event, you need a strategy to execute your plan during the show.

This is your gameday. You put in the work, made team assignments, updated your marketing materials, scheduled a key executive to meet with attendees, and the sales team or lead generation partner qualified leads before you even set foot on the trade show floor. Your team is prepared for success.

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You need to get your budget approved for a trade show, but like most Marketing Directors and Marketing Leaders, you’re dreading that conversation with the CEO or Finance department to justify the expense.

And because of past experience, you might also be doubting the effectiveness of trade shows and whether to send your team to the next event. Consider this: studies have shown that about 81 percent of trade show attendees have authority to purchase your solution. That represents tremendous selling opportunities.What you need is a trade show plan before the event to capture how you will generate a return on investment for your company.

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Many salespeople suffer from Premature Proposal Syndrome (PPS), which I call an involuntary reaction to propose a solution as soon as they hear a problem.

Inexperienced or shortsighted salespeople often jump at the first problem they hear to provide a solution. But, this practice can lead to small deals or no deals at all by not understanding the full scope of the problem or opportunity the prospect is facing.

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The biggest problems that salespeople create for themselves or your company boils down to not preparing and not understanding a prospect’s current circumstances. Here’s some good news: these problems can be solved!

Often, a salesperson tries to actively sell during a cold call - either premeditated or by getting swept up in the excitement of a potential sale. This is common when salespeople are unprepared, too eager to make a sale without listening to the prospect, or do not have confidence to walk a prospect through the complete sales process.

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The biggest mistakes that your sales team will make during a cold call with a prospect can easily be avoided. But, some salespeople lose track of their goal, take shortcuts, or jump ahead in the sales process.

Through years of industry experience, I have concluded that the three biggest mistakes salespeople make boils down to a lack of preparation. The inclination to skip the details and go right for the sale has undermined too many good salespeople.

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When your sales team experiences a hostile prospect call, it’s time to review your processes to determine what caused the hostility.

If your salespeople are contributing to the hostility, then a review of best practices is in order. If it’s just a matter of the prospect having a bad day, your team can still reverse the hostile call to continue selling.

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After reading our companion blog on the 10 Most Important Things to Do when closing the deal, it is important to get more perspective on the other side.

In this blog, we will look at how to resolve the nine most important things not to do when closing the deal. Even the most seasoned salesperson or sales manager needs to be refreshed on this part of the sales process to assess blind spots or bad habits that could be holding back your sales organization.

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 One of the biggest misconceptions in the sales industry is that closing the deal is the end of the initial sales process. It is an important step, but it is not a one-time event.

Good salespeople know how to close a deal, but they stop selling after implementing their solution. However, great salespeople not only know how to close the deal, but they continue to add value to their client, build repeat business, and create referrals.

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One of the biggest differentiators between good and great salespeople is the ability to have a comfortable budget discussion with a prospect. 

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